Passionate, fiery, sensual, intense show

Program for Carmen Amaya performance, ca. 1950s. Courtesy of Vivian Alarid Cuadra and Pedro Cuadra. Photo by Blair Clark.

Program for Carmen Amaya performance, ca. 1950s. Courtesy of Vivian Alarid Cuadra and Pedro Cuadra. Photo by Blair Clark.

 

Flamenco: From Spain to New Mexico is on view at the Museum of International Folk Art through September 11, 2016, showing more than 150 objects which not only celebrates, but also it is an in-depth examination of the history and culture of flamenco dance and music as an art form.

 

Marta and Susan Pérez, aka Hermanas Peregrino, Accoutrements for feria ensemble: peine (hair comb), flor (flower), abanico (fan), pedientes (earrings), Sevilla, Spain, 2008. Cotton, wood, plastic, metal. IFAF Collection, Museum of International Folk Art (FA.2008.71.3-5, earrings FA.2008.36.1v). Photo by Blair Clark. Collection Museum of International Folk Art. Photo Blair Clark.

Marta and Susan Pérez, aka Hermanas Peregrino, Accoutrements for feria ensemble: peine (hair comb), flor (flower), abanico (fan), pedientes (earrings), Sevilla, Spain, 2008. Cotton, wood, plastic, metal. IFAF Collection, Museum of International Folk Art (FA.2008.71.3-5, earrings FA.2008.36.1v). Photo by Blair Clark. Collection Museum of International Folk Art. Photo Blair Clark.

Tracing flamenco’s journey from fifteenth and sixteenth century Spain to twentieth century Europe’s most cultured cities are costumes both historic and contemporary, musical instruments, costume and set design sketches, playbills, sheet music, posters and more. These objects chronicle flamenco’s evolution from rural, folkloric tradition to elaborate staged productions incorporating extravagantly costumed dancers accompanied by virtuoso guitarists. The objects also trace flamenco’s transition to recording studios and the silver screen permitting it to gain a massive popular audience.

Handed down from generation to generation, between family and community members living at society’s edges, flamenco incorporates historic dance and music traditions from Roman times to the Arabic period. Flamenco expresses a way of life shaped by a multitude of cultural and regional influences such as the Gitanos (Romany people) of Spain and Andalusian regional customs. In 2010, UNESCO declared flamenco a Masterpiece of the Intangible Heritage of Humanity.

Pablo Rodarte, Costume sketch, mid-1990s. Courtesy of Lili del Castillo and Luís Campos. Courtesy of Lili del Castillo and Luís Campos.

Pablo Rodarte, Costume sketch, mid-1990s. Courtesy of Lili del Castillo and Luís Campos. Courtesy of Lili del Castillo and Luís Campos.

In addition, ‘Flamenco’ also examines Spain’s ferias and fiestas, their introduction to the southwestern US, and the individuals who contributed to making flamenco a popular art form in this country. And as the exhibition title suggests, flamenco’s integration into New Mexico’s culture will be examined.

Exhibition curator Nicolasa Chávez said, “Flamenco is often considered an outward expression of one’s innermost emotions, whether happy or sad, and carries with it an air of freedom or abandon.” She noted that other exhibitions have only featured flamenco through photography and imagery while this exhibition explores flamenco as a multifaceted art form, a highly cherished performance art remaining true to its cultural roots and heritage. The exhibition is also the first ever to show the history and development of flamenco and its treasured role within the cultural milieu of New Mexico.

For more information, see: www.internationalfolkart.org. or contact Nicolasa Chavez by calling 505.476.1219 or email: Nicolasa.Chavez@state.nm.us.




Published by on January 2016. Filed under Archives, At the Museums dept, New Mexico, News (Time related), Palette News Arts Network/PNAN, PaletteBoards Section. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

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