DC: Washington

Romeyn de Hooghe, engraving in Govard Bidloo, Komste van Zyne Majesteit Willem III. Koning van Groot Britanje, enz. in Holland, The Hague, 1691, National Gallery of Art Library, David K. E. Bruce Fund.

Romeyn de Hooghe, engraving in Govard Bidloo, Komste van Zyne Majesteit Willem III. Koning van Groot Britanje, enz. in Holland, The Hague, 1691, National Gallery of Art Library, David K. E. Bruce Fund.

WHERE: National Gallery of Art.

On view through January 25, 2015.

From the Library: The Book Illustrations by Romeyn de Hooghe

BRIEF ABOUT: During his lifetime, Romeyn de Hooghe (1645–1708) produced a tremendous body of work, including etchings, decorative frontispieces and illustrated books of political satire and commentary. Yet despite this, and his powerful connections with the House of Orange, De Hooghe was largely forgotten. Now, scholars are fully delving into his surviving work. This installation will feature a range of the genres to which De Hooghe contributed.

On view through January 4, 2015.

Captain Linnaeus Tripe: Photographer of India and Burma, 1852–1860

     British photographer Captain Linnaeus Tripe (1822–1902) captured some of the earliest photographs of India and Burma (now Myanmar). Approximately 60 photographs taken between 1854 and 1860, document the dramatic landscapes and the architecture of celebrated religious and secular sites in India and Burma, several of which are now destroyed.

Linnaeus Tripe, Madura: The Vygay River, with Causeway, across to Madura, January-February 1858, albumen print, National Gallery of Art, Washington, The Carolyn Brody Fund and Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation through Robert and Joyce Menschel.

Linnaeus Tripe, Madura: The Vygay River, with Causeway, across to Madura, January-February 1858, albumen print, National Gallery of Art, Washington, The Carolyn Brody Fund and Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation through Robert and Joyce Menschel.

     “Tripe occupies a special place in the history of 19th-century photography for his foresight in recognizing that photography could be an effective tool for conveying information about unknown cultures and regions,” said Earl A. Powell III, director, National Gallery of Art. “We are delighted to premiere this exhibition for visitors interested in photography, architecture, and history, and we hope that these captivating images provide inspiration to all.”

About

From an upper-middle-class family in Devonport, England, Linnaeus Tripe (1822–1902) joined the British East India Company in 1839 and was assigned to the 12th Madras Native Infantry. After several years of deployment in India, he returned to England in 1851 and began to explore an interest in photography. In 1853 he joined the Photographic Society of London.

     Reflecting his military training as an officer in the British army, Tripe had great technical success in India and Burma, even though the tropical heat and humidity affected photographic chemistry. Yet Tripe’s destiny as a photographer was linked to the fate of the British Empire in India. Despite his professional achievements and technical innovations, rebellions in the late 1850s prompted a new era of oversight and regulations for the recently nationalized East India Company, and the British government took over the administration and rule of India, making it a crown colony. Tripe was forced to close his studio in 1860 because of cost-cutting measures, and he almost completely abandoned photography as a result.

MORE DETAILS: For more information call 202.737.4215 see www.nga.gov.




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