Upcoming shows at MAG

Naruki Oshima (b. 1963), Reflections in a Scene of Two Plants (2004). Archival inkjet print.
Naruki Oshima (b. 1963), Reflections in a Scene of Two Plants (2004). inkjet print.

 

Sunday, January 19-March 16, 2014 in the Grand Gallery.

Redefining the Multiple: 13 Contemporary Japanese Printmakers

 

Saori Miyake (b. 1975), A House and the Yard (2011). Photogram, gelatin silver print.

Saori Miyake (b. 1975), A House and the Yard (2011). Photogram, gelatin silver print.

By definition, most of the processes used by printmakers lend themselves to the creation of multiple impressions.

     This exhibition features work by 13 contemporary Japanese artists, ranging in age from their mid-twenties to mid-sixties, who are today “redefining the multiple” in new and exciting ways.

     All 13 are formally trained in printmaking, which has a long and rich history in Japan, and the production of multiples remains at the core of their creative process. But many have transitioned to other media—both two- and three-dimensional—to explore subjects ranging from the traditional to the abstract.

      Among the results are an oversize installation composed of etchings on cotton wool; compositions of acrylic ink squeegeed onto glass; 3-D works of cast resin; and woodblock prints that cast familiar food items in a new light.

 

 Sunday, January 19-March 16, 2014 in the Grand Gallery.

New Beginnings: Japanese Prints of the 1950s, 60s, and 70s

 

A companion show to Redefining the Multiple, New Beginnings showcases 17 works from MAG’s permanent collection that were created by Japanese printmakers after World War II.

      These artists approached their medium in diverse and inventive ways, pursuing traditional forms as well as looking beyond their traditions to Western techniques and subject matter.

 

Friday, January 31-May 5, 2014 in the Lockhart Gallery.

 

Eduardo Paolozzi, An Empire of Silly Statistics… A Fake War for Public Relations. From the portfolio General Dynamic F.U.N. (1970).

Eduardo Paolozzi, An Empire of Silly Statistics… A Fake War for Public Relations. From the portfolio General Dynamic F.U.N. (1970).

 

Eduardo Paolozzi’s General Dynamic F.U.N.

 

Eduardo Paolozzi, Llalla Pallooza… Image fades but memory lingers on. From the portfolio General Dynamic F.U.N. (1970).

Eduardo Paolozzi, Llalla Pallooza… Image fades but memory lingers on. From the portfolio General Dynamic F.U.N. (1970).

From across the ocean, British Pop artist Eduardo Paolozzi (1924–2005) absorbed American popular culture with delight and dismay.

Eduardo Paolozzi, Decency and Decorum in Production. From the portfolio General Dynamic F.U.N. (1970).

Eduardo Paolozzi, Decency and Decorum in Production. From the portfolio General Dynamic F.U.N. (1970).

     His 1970 portfolio of screenprints and photolithographs General Dynamic F.U.N. featured 50 dizzying images drawn from the artist’s personal collection of American magazines and comics.

     Influenced by the collage aesthetic of the Surrealist and Dada movements, Paolozzi poured iconic images of 1960s America—Liz Taylor, television sets, robots, motorcycles, Mickey Mouse and Mr. Peanut—into the blender of his unconscious mind and set it to spin.

MORE DETAILS on Memorial Art Gallery in Rochester, New York: http://mag.rochester.edu.




Published by on January 2014. Filed under Archives, Art-to-Art Palette NewsWire/AAPNW, At the Centers dept, New York, PaletteBoards Section. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

Comments are closed







VOICES

AAMG CLASSIFIEDS