Educators to tell all

The relief on view at GMOA is one of a few Roman replicas of the original Greek work and the only replica known still to contain remnants of its ancient coloration, the focus of study while it has been in Athens. Although today’s museum visitors expect ancient Greek and Roman marble sculptures to be pure white, they were originally vibrantly painted.

The relief on view at GMOA is one of a few Roman replicas of the original Greek work and the only replica known still to contain remnants of its ancient coloration, the focus of study while it has been in Athens. Although today’s museum visitors expect ancient Greek and Roman marble sculptures to be pure white, they were originally vibrantly painted.

WHERE: Georgia Museum of Art, Athens, Georgia.

WHEN: Thursday, March 28, at 5:30 pm in the M. Smith Griffith Auditorium.

BRIEF ABOUT: A panel discussion with Mark Abbe, UGA assistant professor of ancient art; Tina Salguero, UGA assistant professor of chemistry; and Jeff Speakman, associate director of UGA’s Center for Applied Isotope Studies, on the current technical study of the Orpheus Relief sculpture that has been on loan to GMOA from the University of Mississippi Museum since September 2012.

     The sculpture depicts Hermes, the Greek messenger god. This relief fragment originally was a part of a three-figure composition of Hermes escorting Eurydice to the Underworld, her final parting from Orpheus. It is this larger composition that is known as the Orpheus Relief and is one of the most celebrated examples of Greek sculpture from the High Classical period, ca. 450–400 B.C.

MORE DETAILS: Call 706.542.4662 or www.georgiamuseum.org.




Published by on March 2013. Filed under Archives, Bugle Section, Educator's Row, Palette News Arts Network/PNAN. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

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